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Renky

Low Testosterone - High ALT - Increasing Ferritin

Hi everyone,

After a while trying to sort all this out, I am back again... I have just had my blood test results come in. My Doctor is saying that I am hypertriglyceridaemia and have borderline low testosterone.

I weight lift, eat well, use supplements and am in good condition. I am in my early 40's.

My ferritin is going up and up and up on each blood test, my cholesterol has gone down from 8.8 to 6.7. My ferritin has risen a lot on the past three blood tests (242 - 287 - 367).

Here are my recent blood test results;

TSH - 0.5 mIU/L ( Reference range - 0.3 - 3.5 )
Free T4 - 14.9 pmol/L ( Reference range - 9.0 - 19.0 )

Prolactin - 110 mIU/L ( Reference range - less than 500 )

Total PSA - 0.29 ug/L ( Reference range - 0.25 - 2.2 )  Lab comments say I am below the norm for a male in my early 40's and prostate neoplasia may be a concern?? What the??

Cortisol - 267 nmol ( Reference range - 100 - 535 )

Chemistry (serum)

Sodium - 141 mmol/L ( Reference range - 135 - 145 )
Potassium - 4.7 mmol/L ( Reference range - 3.5 - 5.5 )
Chloride - 107 mmol/L ( Reference range - 135 - 145 )
Bicarbonate - 21 mmol/L ( Reference range - 20 - 32 )
Anion Gap - 13 mmol/L ( Reference range - 5 - 15 )

Ca (corr) - 2.34 mmol/L ( Reference range - 2.10 - 2.55 )
Phosphate - 1.1 mmol/L ( Reference range - 0.8 - 1.5 )

Urea - 5.6 mmol/L ( Reference range - 3.0 - 8.0 )
Urate - 0.40 mmol/L ( Reference range - 0.20 - 0.50 )
Creatinine - 73 umol/L ( Reference range - 60 - 110 )
eGFR - >90 ( Reference Range - >59 )

Fast Glucose - 5.6 mmol/L ( Reference range - 3.6 - 6.0 )
Random Glucose - 4.7 mmol/L ( Reference range - 3.6 – 7.7 )

Total Protein - 74 g/L ( Reference Range - 66 - 83 )
Albumin - 47 gL ( Reference Range - 39 - 50 )
Globulin - 27 g/L ( Reference Range - 20 - 39 )
T Bilirubin - 12 umol/L ( Reference range - 4 - 20 )
ALP - 60 U/L ( Reference Range - 35 - 110 )
AST - 40 U/L ( Reference Range - 10 - 40 )
ALT - 66 U/L ( Reference Range - 5 - 40 )

GGT - 33 U/L ( Reference Range - 5 - 40 )
LDH - 193 U/L ( Reference Range - 120 - 250 )

Cholesterol - 6.7 mmol/L ( Reference range - 3.9 - 5.5 ) 

Haemolysis Index - 11 ( Reference Range - 0 - 40 )

Androgens

Testosterone - 8.5 nmol/L ( Reference Range - 11.0 - 40.0 )

Anaemia Profile

Iron - 25 umol/L ( Reference Range - 5 - 30 )
Transferrin – 2.3 g/L ( Reference Range – 1.9- 3.1 )
TIBC - 57 umol/L ( Reference Range - 45 - 72 )
Saturation - 44% ( Reference Range - 20 - 55 )
Ferritin - 367 ug/L ( Reference Range - 30 - 300 )


My Doctor has suggest I see an Endocrinologist, I am hoping to avoid this if possible.

What do you think?

Thanks so much!



 

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PSA is good (it means low is good) no inflammation is good.

Cholesterol - generally meaningless...it is protective....keep it high. The body knows what it is doing.

Liver enzymes...something is wrong, but what?  Requires some detective work. 

Why is testosterone low?  Something is amiss...but labs only reveal so much.

 

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Thanks for getting back to me.

My Doc ( a nice guy ), but he did not even look at the ferritin or my ALT. I had my results, left the Surgery and as I was sitting in the car I took a look. When I saw my ferritin at 367, I flipped out and thought "What the??" I ended up going back into see the Doc and he still was not that phased by it. All he said is that it was an inflammation marker. Is it me just being paranoid? When I see numbers consecutively going up like this, I tend to think there is a problem... My Doc has referred me on to an Endocrinologist, to get me checked over. My testosterone is low (it was 7.6, 9 and now the latest is 8.5). I am below the reference range of 11 and supplemental synthetic testosterone is on the discussion table.

How is this for being half backed though... When I went back into the see the Doc about my concerns with the ferritin levels, he asked if he had previously ran an ultrasound on my liver. I said, no. He then said that this is something the Endocrinologist can do. The Doc said briefly that I may have a fatty liver.

I have tried high doses of milk thistle, choline and TUDCA to help my liver and ferritin. So far, nothing... It is still climbing. I have booked myself into the Red Cross to donate blood next week and am prepared to go a number of times to get this under control.

It is hard trying to work this out. What I have found so far is that high ferritin and low testosterone seem to go hand in hand. Will donating blood be enough to fix all this though? My liver seems to have an issue by the looks of all this.

Just not sure what to do...

Thanks...

 

Edited by Renky

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Hi Renky!
Looking at ones blood will only rarely render several potent clues...having that said, in your case the ferritin level info is probably of value and worthy of in depth investigation, but it is not as high as it should be to considered an unquestionable clue: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3093720/

You might want to opt for a DNA-test aiming HFE-HH: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK1440/

I would a also start googling around for terms such as iron overload, elevated ferritin and metabolic syndrome.

Best of luck!

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If it is a fatty liver and/or Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or liver pathology such as simple steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis and cirrhosis. Then would look at your homocysteine levels. An increased serum level of homocysteine may be associated with liver fat accumulation/fatty liver. Genetic mutations in the folate route may only mildly impair homocysteine metabolism.

It is possible that a gene sensitivity for MTHFR C677T and A1298C can affect this. Translation. If not already taking methylated B-complex, would try it.

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Thanks so much!

I am donating blood on Tuesday, so that is a start...

With supplements, I was taking 3g of Vitamin C on n empty stomach before bed, but now have stopped it completely. I may eventually get back onto this but at a dose or 1g. Not sure if this will help or not?

I have read that Green Tea extract is worth taking?

Milk Thistle has done nothing.

It looks like TUDCA did nothing also.

IP6 didn't work either.

I also read somewhere that Calcium is worth taking to lower iron?

Does anyone have any other ideas on what else I can take?

Thanks,

 

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Sure, why not, at least it will help people in need of blood.

3 hours ago, Renky said:

With supplements, I was taking 3g of Vitamin C on n empty stomach before bed, but now have stopped it completely. I may eventually get back onto this but at a dose or 1g. Not sure if this will help or not?

You rarely can go wrong with vitamin C, even if you your body stores iron like a nut, vitamin C can safely be taken just like you do, away from food, before bedtime.
 

3 hours ago, Renky said:

I have read that Green Tea extract is worth taking?

In regards to iron absorption, anti-cancer or for general purposes? When battling imbalances like yours, one or two new supplements might not be able to make all the differences in the world. In some cases (methylation issues etc) they might actually make things worse, if not chosen properly.
 

4 hours ago, Renky said:

I also read somewhere that Calcium is worth taking to lower iron?

Yes well..it's not that simple. Calcium, polyphenols, oxalates, phytates etc do interfere with iron absorption...but will it be significant enough? There are simply two theories on this. YES and NO. But I do think the uptake can be limited ENOUGH to make it worth it, but we first need to know if you are actually a sufferer from this or not..DNA-testing coming up?

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Well, I am REALLY hoping like crazy to not go to an Endocrinologist, so DNA testing?? I would just rather avoid going down this route. I am not big on Doctors and don't totally trust them. I mean, my Doc never even looked at my ferritin (and how it has increased each time) or how my ALT is now way over the limit. I just want to know what to do and I am willing to give it a trial. So if there is a way to get a plan together on this, I would really appreciate it.

So far, all I can find to do is this;

Stop Vitamin C

Donate blood

Take Green Tea extract

Take Calcium

I think I do have non-alcoholic fatty liver and I seem to store iron. Going by my previous test results, things seemed to start going out of kilter back in 2005.

Thanks,

 

 

 

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It looks like my biggest issue is the ALT and the increasing ferritin. It seems that there is a problem with my liver. Any ideas on what is going on?

Thanks,

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For a number of months now, I was taking 3g of Vitamin C before bed on an empty stomach. I also wonder if this was bad for me?

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Free Radic Biol Med. 2014 Oct;75:69-83. doi: 10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2014.07.007. Epub 2014 Jul 15.

The active role of vitamin C in mammalian iron metabolism: much more than just enhanced iron absorption!

Abstract

Ascorbate is a cofactor in numerous metabolic reactions. Humans cannot synthesize ascorbate owing to inactivation of the gene encoding the enzyme l-gulono-γ-lactone oxidase, which is essential for ascorbate synthesis. Accumulating evidence strongly suggests that in addition to the known ability of dietary ascorbate to enhance nonheme iron absorption in the gut, ascorbate within mammalian systems can regulate cellular iron uptake and metabolism. Ascorbate modulates iron metabolism by stimulating ferritin synthesis, inhibiting lysosomal ferritin degradation, and decreasing cellular iron efflux. Furthermore, ascorbate cycling across the plasma membrane is responsible for ascorbate-stimulated iron uptake from low-molecular-weight iron-citrate complexes, which are prominent in the plasma of individuals with iron-overload disorders. Importantly, this iron-uptake pathway is of particular relevance to astrocyte brain iron metabolism and tissue iron loading in disorders such as hereditary hemochromatosisand β-thalassemia. Recent evidence also indicates that ascorbate is a novel modulator of the classical transferrin-iron uptake pathway, which provides almost all iron for cellular demands and erythropoiesis under physiological conditions. Ascorbate acts to stimulate transferrin-dependent iron uptake by an intracellular reductive mechanism, strongly suggesting that it may act to stimulate iron mobilization from the endosome. The ability of ascorbate to regulate transferrin iron uptake could help explain the metabolic defect that contributes to ascorbate-deficiency-induced anemia.

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Thanks!

So this is basically saying that if I have something "off" with my liver and ferritin/ALT levels, it is best to stop Vitamin C?

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Probably not, but is has not been thoroughly evaluated.

Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 1999 Mar;69(2):67-82.

High-dose vitamin C: a risk for persons with high iron stores?

Abstract

The contribution of vitamin C (ascorbic acid) to the prevention of iron deficiency anemia by promoting the absorption of dietary non-heme iron-especially in persons with low iron stores--is well established. But the question has been raised whether high-dose intakes of vitamin C might unduly enhance the absorption of dietary iron in persons with high iron stores or in patients with iron overload, possibly increasing the potential risk of iron toxicity. Extensive studies have shown that overall the uptake and storage of iron in humans is efficiently controlled by a network of regulatory mechanisms. Even high vitamin C intakes do not cause iron imbalance in healthy persons and probably in persons who are heterozygous for hemochromatosis. The uptake, renal tubular reabsorption and storage of vitamin C itself are also strictly limited after high-dose intake so that no excessive plasma and tissue concentrations of vitamin C are produced. The effect of high-dose vitamin C on iron absorption in patients with iron overload due to homozygous hemochromatosis has not been studied. Of special importance is the early identification of hemochromatosis patients, which is assisted by the newly developed PCR test for hereditary hemochromatosis. Specific treatment consists of regular phlebotomy and possibly iron-chelating therapy. These patients should moreover avoid any possibility of facilitated absorption of iron and need to limit their intake of iron. Patients with beta-thalassemia major and sickle cell anemia who suffer from iron overload due to regular blood transfusions or excessive destruction of red blood cells need specialized medical treatment with iron chelators and should also control their intake of iron. The serum of patients with pathological iron overload can contain non-transferrin-bound iron inducing lipid peroxidation with subsequent consumption of antioxidants such as vitamin E and vitamin C. The role of iron in coronary heart disease and cancer is controversial. Early suggestions that moderately elevated iron stores are associated with an increased risk of CHD have not been confirmed by later studies. In vitro, ascorbic acid can act as a prooxidant in the presence of transition metals such as iron or copper, but in the living organism its major functions are as an antioxidant. High intakes of vitamin C have thus not been found to increase oxidative damage in humans. Accordingly, the risk of CHD or cancer is not elevated. On the contrary, most studies have shown that diets rich in vitamin C are inversely related to the incidence of these diseases.

 

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Thanks for this!

At the moment, I have stopped the Vitamin C (Quali-C). Something has been causing my ferritin to leap up in regular amounts. My ALT really jumped up last time too.

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